International Journal of Critical Care https://wfccn-ijcc.com/index.php/ijcc <p><em>International Journal of Critical Care</em> is the official journal of the World Federation of Critical Care Nurses. It builds on the legacy and successes of <em>Connect,</em> the former Journal, and endeavors to be a truly global vehicle for sharing the latest research, initiatives, policy advice, and achievements in critical care. </p> University of Alberta Library en-US International Journal of Critical Care A New Journal for a New Era https://wfccn-ijcc.com/index.php/ijcc/article/view/15 <p>Critical care practice has never been more impactful than it is today. On the back of the worst pandemic in over 100 years, critical care clinicians are being exemplified as people who save and restore lives every day in communities worldwide, as never before. It is important to maintain a long-lasting and robust focus on the vital contribution of critical care practice in the health and wellbeing of each community and nation globally and to share our intellectual and practical resources to ensure a better and safer future for all.</p> Ged Williams Elizabeth Papathanassoglou Patricia Zrelak Copyright (c) 2022 https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0 2022-04-29 2022-04-29 16 1 1 2 ICU Clinician Perceptions of COVID-19 ICU Readiness: Results of a Thematic Analysis of National U.S. Survey Data https://wfccn-ijcc.com/index.php/ijcc/article/view/30 <p>The COVID-19 pandemic has greatly impacted intensive care unit (ICU) clinicians worldwide. Case number surges resulted in high or even above-capacity ICU patient census, limited bed availability, clinical staffing strains, and concerns about maintaining adequate medication, personal protective equipment (PPE), and equipment supplies to ensure optimal patient care. In the United States, a series of rapid cycle COVID-19 surveys were disseminated to ICU clinicians to assess ICU readiness and ongoing challenges posed by the pandemic. This article reports on a qualitative thematic analysis of the descriptive data for general themes provided by over 800 ICU nurses, advanced practice providers, physicians, pharmacists and respiratory therapists, reflecting upon their perceptions from the early to mid-pandemic timeline.</p> Wendy Kollross Bonnie Pilon Ryan Maves David Ferraro Ruth Kleinpell Copyright (c) 2022 https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0 2022-04-29 2022-04-29 16 1 44 54 Self-assessed Competence of Nurses in Critical Care Units in Malawi: A Cross-sectional Survey https://wfccn-ijcc.com/index.php/ijcc/article/view/18 <p><strong>Background</strong>: The birth of a premature infant and admission to the NICU is often unexpected and traumatic for families, leading to increased distress and can negatively impact parental-infant attachment. Appropriate interventions can help to lessen the negative impact of a NICU admission on families, improving parental mental health, reducing distress, enhancing parent- infant relationships, and improving the long-term physical, cognitive, emotional, and social development of the infant.</p> <p><strong>Aims:</strong> The purpose of this study is to examine and evaluate research evidence on the effectiveness of current interventions for improving parental distress in the NICU. <strong>Methods:</strong> A rapid review was conducted utilizing a protocol based on the Virginia Commonwealth University guidance. Keyword searches were conducted on CINAHL, MEDLINE, and PsychINFO, and studies were selected according to pre-defined eligibility criteria, published between January 2015 and January 2020. The literature search included primary studies of interventions with parental stress and/or anxiety reduction as outcomes.</p> <p><strong>Results:</strong> A total of 14 articles were included, evaluating the effectiveness of 13 different interventions, including narrative writing, art therapy, structured nursing interventions, anxiety counselling, spiritual care, organizational change, music therapy, relaxation, and mindfulness techniques. With the Pexception of three, all the studies found significant results in the reduction of stress and/or anxiety levels of the subjects, with mothers having overall higher levels of stress indicated by higher stress scores on standardized measurement tools.</p> <p><strong>Conclusion:</strong>&nbsp; There is a need for ongoing assessment of parental distress and integration of appropriate interventions within the NICU settings. In this review, both individualized and group interventions including narrative writing, art therapy, music therapy, spiritual care, activity-based group therapy, music therapy, audio-assisted relaxation techniques, mindfulness based neurodevelopmental care, cognitive behavioral based counselling, family nurture intervention and a structured nursing intervention were shown to be effective in reducing parental stress and/or anxiety in the NICU.&nbsp; The small scale of the studies included in this review impact generalizability to a broader audience and emphasizes the need for larger scope, multi-center studies at an international level to build on and broaden our level of knowledge on how to better support families and reduce parental distress in the NICU.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> Rodwell Gundo Beatrice Gundo Ellen Chirwa Annette Dickinson Gael Mearns Copyright (c) 2022 https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0 2022-04-29 2022-04-29 16 1 55 67 Effectiveness of Current Interventions to Alleviate Parental Distress in the NICU: A Rapid Review https://wfccn-ijcc.com/index.php/ijcc/article/view/23 <p><strong>Background:</strong> The birth of a premature infant and admission to the NICU is often unexpected and traumatic for families, leading to increased distress and can negatively impact parental-infant attachment. Appropriate interventions can help to lessen the negative impact of a NICU admission on families, improving parental mental health, reducing distress, enhancing parent- infant relationships, and improving the long-term physical, cognitive, emotional, and social development of the infant.</p> <p><strong>Aims:</strong> The purpose of this study is to examine and evaluate research evidence on the effectiveness of current interventions for improving parental distress in the NICU.</p> <p><strong>Methods:</strong> A rapid review was conducted utilizing a protocol based on the Virginia Commonwealth University guidance. Keyword searches were conducted on CINAHL, MEDLINE, and PsychINFO, and studies were selected according to pre-defined eligibility criteria, published between January 2015 and January 2020. The literature search included primary studies of interventions with parental stress and/or anxiety reduction as outcomes.</p> <p><strong>Results:</strong> A total of 14 articles were included, evaluating the effectiveness of 13 different interventions, including narrative writing, art therapy, structured nursing interventions, anxiety counselling, spiritual care, organizational change, music therapy, relaxation, and mindfulness techniques. With the Pexception of three, all the studies found significant results in the reduction of stress and/or anxiety levels of the subjects, with mothers having overall higher levels of stress indicated by higher stress scores on standardized measurement tools.</p> <p><strong> Conclusion:</strong> There is a need for ongoing assessment of parental distress and integration of appropriate interventions within the NICU settings. In this review, both individualized and group interventions including narrative writing, art therapy, music therapy, spiritual care, activity-based group therapy, music therapy, audio-assisted relaxation techniques, mindfulness based neurodevelopmental care, cognitive behavioral based counselling, family nurture intervention and a structured nursing intervention were shown to be effective in reducing parental stress and/or anxiety in the NICU. The small scale of the studies included in this review impact generalizability to a broader audience and emphasizes the need for larger scope, multi-center studies at an international level to build on and broaden our level of knowledge on how to better support families and reduce parental distress in the NICU.</p> Darylle Shudra Elizabeth Papathanassoglou Amber Reichert Copyright (c) 2022 https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0 2022-04-29 2022-04-29 16 1 3 43 Abstracts from the 17th Emirates Critical Care Conference and 16th World Federation of Critical Care Nurses (WFCCN) Hybrid World Congress https://wfccn-ijcc.com/index.php/ijcc/article/view/24 <p>Oral and poster abstracts from the 17th Emirates Critical Care Conference and 16th World Federation of Critical Care Nurses (WFCCN) Hybrid World Congress held on the 18th and 19th of June,&nbsp;2021. &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> Evanthia Georgiou James Waterson Marios Georgiou Muna Shaqsi Pooja Nair Vilma Cristobal Tugume Daniel Kasozi Nammaga Iman Ateeq Veronika Kotanidi Nicos Middleton Yuri Sakaki Mini Thomas Kanako Yamamoto Alyssa Escalante Balaraman Devendiran Christos Rossis Evangelia Giannelou Maria Karanikola Margarita Giannakopoulou Elizabeth Papathanassoglou Faith Sila Georgios Papageorgiou Nicos Middleton Meropi Mpouzika Copyright (c) 2022 https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0 2022-04-29 2022-04-29 16 1 73 84 Call for Papers https://wfccn-ijcc.com/index.php/ijcc/article/view/21 <p>The International Journal of Critical Care is seeking manuscripts on topics of interest to critical and emergency care nurses and allied health practitioners around the world. We accept a variety of papers. We are particularly keen to receive evidence-based articles that inform policy and practice, integrating health and nursing research into clinical practice. Such articles include but are not limited to clinical and basic research studies; articles that address noteworthy advances in critical and emergency care; scholarly reviews; case reports; education related to critical care practice; letters to the editors; reflections of practitioners and individuals with a critical illness experience; and information about developments of member organizations of the World Federation of Critical Care Nurses (WFCCN).&nbsp; Please refer to the website for author guidelines.&nbsp;</p> Patricia Zrelak Copyright (c) 2022 https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0 2022-05-20 2022-05-20 16 1 85 85 Photo Contest https://wfccn-ijcc.com/index.php/ijcc/article/view/20 <p>The International Journal of Critical Care is having photo contest.&nbsp; Please consider submitting a photo.&nbsp;</p> Pattricia Zrelak Copyright (c) 2022 Patricia A. Zrelak PhD, RN, NEA-BC, SCRN, CNRN, FAHA https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0 2022-04-29 2022-04-29 16 1 86 86 Nursing Initiatives in the Emergency Department During the COVID-19 Pandemic: The COVID-19 Update Team https://wfccn-ijcc.com/index.php/ijcc/article/view/19 <p>The COVID-19 pandemic is a challenge facing healthcare systems worldwide. Emergency Departments are frontline units that need to be properly prepared to protect clinicians from SARS-CoV-2. During the first wave of the pandemic, four emergency nurses of the Nicosia General Hospital in the Republic of Cyprus formed the COVID-19 Update Team. The team aimed to update guidelines about infection prevention and management of COVID-19 disease and inform health care professionals of the emergency department. This report describes the initiatives developed by this team and its future plans.</p> Meropi Mpouzika Maria Karanikola Christos Rossis George Papageorgiou Copyright (c) 2022 https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0 2022-04-29 2022-04-29 16 1 68 72